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Bilirubin Chart For Newborn

Submitted by Nic on October 15, 2012

Bilirubin can be described as the yellowish substance that is produced by the liver, when old cells are broken down. In case the levels of bilirubin in the body are within the normal range, it does not create a problem; however, at times it is possible for the amount of bilirubin in the body to rise to a very high level, which in turn can lead to serious health complications. In most cases, a person could suffer from jaundice, in case the levels of bilirubin in the body rise very high. Moreover, if the levels are not controlled soon, it could lead to a brain injury too.

What is a bilirubin chart for newborn babies?

A bilirubin chart newborn babies is like a graph or a chart, which can help to measure the levels of bilirubin in a newborn baby's blood. Several health experts are known to use a neonatal bilirubin chart, or an infant bilirubin chart, so that they can keep a track of the amount of bilirubin that is present in the baby's blood. After the information has been analyzed and gathered on a bilirubin chart for newborn children, the doctor can decide whether or not a baby needs to undergo jaundice treatment. The information recorded on a bilirubin chart for infants can also be very useful in identifying the type of treatment that the baby needs to undergo.

According to a bilirubin chart in newborn babies, the normal values that have been highlighted are:

Premature Babies

  • Less than 24 hours: Below 8.0 mg/ dl (below 137 mmol/ l)
  • Less than 48 hours: Below 12.0 mg/ dl (below 205 mmol/ l)
  • Aged between 3 and 5 days: Below 15.0 mg/ dl (below 256 mmol/ l)
  • Aged 7 days and older: Below 15.0 mg/ dl (below 256 mmol/ l)

Full Term Babies

  • Less than 24 hours: Below 6.0 mg/ dl (below 103 mmol/ l)
  • Less than 48 hours: Below 10.0 mg/ dl (below 170 mmol/ l)
  • Aged between 3 and 5 days: Below 12.0 mg/ dl (below 205 mmol/ l)
  • Aged 7 days and older: Below 10.0 mg/ dl (below 170 mmol/ l)

With full term babies, if the bilirubin levels are only slightly higher than the normal values listed in the bilirubin chart for newborn babies, then treatment may not even be required. However, all instances of high levels of bilirubin in a child should be closely monitored by a doctor.

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